The room is di635_Greenleaf_coverm, the tie dye bedspread redolent with patchouli and the 70s are just a wisp of fragrant smoke away as we are tumbled headlong into Greenleaf’s 7th album via a clamour of tumultuous drums.

Originally a side project formed by Tommi Holappa of Dozer and Demon Cleaner’s Daniel Liden, Greenleaf have been doing their thing since 2000 and Rise above the Meadow is a riff-tastic example of stoner rock at its finest. With few tracks under 5 mins, listening requires commitment but the pay off is worth it.

The imagery if fantastical, bringing to mind beards and bards, denim and doom and, if Lancelot had an iPod, this is what he would have been listening to as he cavorted on the banks of the Lake.

This album is also fantastic for playing spot-the-influences. Million Fireflies is pure Sabbath, whilst Funeral Pyre brings to mind elements of Black Widow’s “Come to the Sabbat”. The rest of the album gives us shades of Zappa and Zeppelin, in equal measure until we get to Golden Throne, which is the shortest, liveliest track on the album and boasts the dirty bass and stomping rhythmic blues style common to QOTSA and The Black Keys.
Levitate is the longest track on the album and leads us deep down the rabbit hole into the Doors territory. The slow build-up leads to an expansive chorus; a ballad to the Goddess of the Greenleaf as they entreat her to “get us stoned and we’ll come right back…to life.” If you squint, you can almost make out Jim Morrison standing alongside the stage, nodding along in approval.

Having recently come off the Up in Smoke tour, Greenleaf are bound to be doing the rounds of festivals this summer and I would definitely recommend checking them out.

 

Greenleaf - Rise Above the Meadow

Released: 2016

Record Label: Napalm Records

Band Website: Facebook

Buy Album: Napalm Records Shop

4.4Overall Score

About The Author

Kate is an indie-aficionado with riot-grrl roots who took a brief, teenage detour through the murky swamps of Trad Goth. Nowadays she is equally likely to be found swaying to Nick Cave and pogoing to punk. If it's loud, with strong lyrics and a bass line you can feel in your teeth, then it's gotta be good!

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